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Carlisle Adult Day Center is enrolling new clients

The National Adult Day Services Association (NADSA) defines Adult Day programs as “a professional care setting in which older adults and adults living with dementia…receive individualized therapeutic, social, and health services for some part of the day.”

Carlisle Adult Day clients enjoy gardening with the Master Gardeners from Penn State.

Messiah Lifeways Adult Day services go above and beyond in providing a positive, nurturing programming to meet a variety of needs in clients, especially those with a dementia diagnosis. Music, art, exercise, gardening, service projects, a hot lunch, special events… everything is geared towards socialization and maintaining the cognitive and physical abilities of each client. We don’t dwell on what has been lost; we focus on what is still possible.

We’re also keenly aware of the difficulties facing caregivers in Central Pennsylvania. Adult children need to continue working, devoted spouses become weary with caregiver burnout, families and neighbors feel ill-equipped to help. Adult Day programs like ours provide a safety net – a safe haven – for the clients and their loved ones. The Messiah Lifeways Adult Day programs are also strongly connected to the Alzheimer’s Association which adds an extra layer of support through training, resources, and caregiver support groups that help the entire family.

If someone you love is unable to stay safely at home during the work week due to memory impairment or another age-related concern or you know someone who would benefit from the services at a Messiah Lifeways Adult Day Services, please feel free to help spread the word. Some additional points of interest about Messiah Lifeways Adult Day programs:

• They’re secured and thoroughly equipped to put the caregiver’s mind at ease.
• They employ team members, including several Registered Nurses, who are well trained in therapeutic programming, validation and remotivation therapy, and more.
• Focus on the client – their memories, their interests, their hobbies, to make each day meaningful and positive.
• May help to reduce the unwanted behaviors that sometimes challenges families and caregivers.

Our Mechanicsburg Center is currently on a waiting list but our Carlisle Center does have openings. Melissa Brandt, the Carlisle Center Coordinator would welcome the opportunity to give tours and talk about the admission process with anyone who is interested. The Carlisle Adult Day program is located at The Meeting House, Carlisle Campus, 1155 Walnut Bottom Road.

Melissa can be reached at: 717-243-0447 or via email at mbrandt@messiahlifeways.org

To learn more about Messiah Lifeways Adult Services, please visit MessiahLifeways.org/AdultDay.

 

Adult Day Services: Enriching Lives & Supporting Caregivers

Caring for an aging parent or ailing spouse while trying to fulfill the promise of helping them age in place can be a struggle. This is especially true for a growing segment of caregivers who have a parent or spouse they’re caring for, while simultaneously still raising kids or even grandkids. Known as the “sandwich generation,” many of them are also still working, and therefore their plates are quite full, as you might imagine.

Often as the caregiver goes to work or needs to run errands, their loved one may be alone throughout the day. The fear of falling, dementia, isolation, and boredom can create an unsafe or less than desirable home life. Hiring care to look after them during the day is an option, but it can be cost prohibitive at times or it may not provide the stimulation they need or desire. Likewise, avoiding a move to a care community is counter to their goal. This is where Adult Day Services could be the solution.

Adult Day provides great balance 

Adult Day programs offer a great balance by enriching and caring for those trying to age in place, while supporting and relieving caregivers juggling their busy lives. Adult Day clients get the care, stimulation, and support they need on a daily basis. But at the end of the day they return home with their family or spouse. This takes a lot of pressure off of the spouse or the adult children as they go about the rest of their busy day. It is also reassuring for them to know that they are being cared for, eating well, having their medications administered, plus are participating in activities and socializing with their peers.

Affordable and flexible

It is also extremely affordable compared to other forms of daily care, and with financial assistance, typically through county funding, it is accessible to most everyone. Another great aspect is its flexibility. The Adult Day programs in Mechanicsburg and Carlisle are open Monday through Friday, but clients can attend as little as 1 or 2 days a week for 4 or 8 hours. They also open at 7:15 am and close around 5:00 pm to allow for early and late pick up.

Adult Day could be the solution you’re looking for

The chart below provides a great overview of the program, why it might be the right fit for you. It also gives detail on the services, support, and enrichment available to those in the program. [Hover and click on the chart for a larger view]

To learn more or to schedule a visit, please call 717.790.8224 for the Mechanicsburg Center or 717.243.0447 for Carlisle or visit MessiahLifeways.org/AdultDay.


 

Home Care: A Cornerstone to Aging in Place

Every November, the National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) celebrates National Home Care Month all month long, and Home Care Aide Week, which runs from November 13-19, 2016. It is a time to honor the care giving heroes who make a remarkable difference in the lives of those in need. This year’s theme is “Caring in Action.”

November is Homecare MonthHome care lies at the core of helping aging and disabled Americans stay in their home for longer periods of time. It can potentially lessen the amount of time someone may spend in an assisted living residence, personal care home, or nursing home. Of course there are many other resources to help people “age in place or community.” Other options include home health care, which provides short-term medical care into the home, adult day programs, respite care, technology, home modification, and in-home medical equipment. Home care services combined with one or several of these other home-based resources can create a workable blueprint to help someone age in place.

The Evolution of Community-Based Care
There are a number of reasons for this shift toward community-based care. First is the government’s dwindling ability to fund healthcare. And with nearly 76 million baby boomers reaching age 65 in the next 20 years, coverage for institutional care will become harder and harder to get. Because of this, the free market is joining the movement away from an institutional model of care and pushing for more community support services. It is the direction health care services are headed in our country. This is why you are seeing more urgent care centers, home care agencies, and hospice providers popping up in the community. It is simply cheaper to take care of someone if they don’t have to be hospitalized or placed in a facility, which is what most people want anyway.

These 76 million boomers represent a large and powerful generation whose demands and expectations of care will be very different from what we are used to seeing. Once more the idea of bringing services into the home and modifying homes will be the future for this rapidly growing number of seniors. Other factors compounding this evolution of care include our ever increasing life spans which require longer periods of care and funding. Secondly, over the last three decades, the number of family members, especially daughters, serving as caregivers has shrunk as our society becomes more mobile and career-oriented making a move out of town, state, or country more common. The way we used to care for our elders has changed. Just as nursing homes and personal care homes have provided surrogate care for aging loved ones over the last several decades, the idea of substituting care with home care aides has become more conventional. It helps working daughters (or sons), sandwich generation caregivers, out-of-towners, and spouses to replace or supplement the care they provide.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice states that demographic shift studies translate into some [troubling] data. The number of frail older people over 65 is expected to increase from 11 million in 2010 to 18 million in 2030. The percentage of frail older people who are childless is expected to rise from 14 to 18 percent during this period, and the ratio of frail, older people who have only one or two adult children is expected to increase from 38 to 49 percent. Most of these aging boomers will want to remain in their homes, but they may not be able to count on their families for long-term care when it’s needed.

Home Care Can Fill Many Niches
Not only has health care evolved to put a greater emphasis on community-based services, but home care itself is evolving. Traditional housekeeping, cooking, companionship, transportation and assistance with activities like bathing and dressing are generally offered by most non-medical home care providers. However, home care providers such as Messiah Lifeways At Home now offer a unique array of services that buoy one’s ability to live safely and more carefree at home. Some of these newer and less known options include: pet and plant care,  non-skilled home maintenance, downsizing services, assistance with home exercise programs, and technology/computer assistance.

Lastly, in a time where the expanding need along with the absence of consistent familial support continue to grow, home care staff fill a void and become more than just caregivers for their clients. They become almost like close friends or even family and are poised to play a key role at the center of caregiving in our country.


To learn more, go to MessiahLifeways.org/AtHome or call 717.790.8209. For information on home care services for the entire state, visit the Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA) home care locator link [click here].

Originally posted November 2013- Revised for November 2016
by: Matthew Gallardo, Messiah Lifeways Coach, BASW, CCP
National Home Care Month

Celebrating National Home Care Month

Every November, the National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) celebrates National Home Care Month and recognizes it as a time to honor the caregiving heroes who make a remarkable difference in the lives of those in need. This year’s theme is “Home Care Delivers Freedom.”

Home care truly does deliver freedom and is at the center of helping aging and disabled Americans preserve their health, independence, and self-determination in the comfort of their own home. Furthermore, home care bolstered by one or more other home-based services or resources can create a workable blueprint to help individuals “age in place” and potentially lessen the amount of time one may spend in an assisted living residence, personal care home, or nursing home. Other community-based resources include home health care, which provides short-term medical care in the home, adult day programs, respite care, care based technology, home modification, and in-home medical equipment.

The Evolution of Community-Based Care

There are a number of reasons for this shift toward community-based care. First is the government’s dwindling ability to fund healthcare. And with nearly 78 million baby boomers reaching age 65 in the next 20 years, coverage for institutional care will become harder and harder to get. Because of this, the free market is joining the movement away from an institutional model of care and pushing for more community-based services. It is the direction health care services are headed in our country. This is why you are seeing more urgent care centers, home care agencies, and hospice providers popping up in the community. It is simply cheaper to take care of someone if they don’t have to be hospitalized or placed in a facility, which is what most people want anyway.

These 78 million boomers represent a large and powerful generation whose demands and expectations of care will be very different from what we are used to seeing. Once more the idea of bringing services into the home and modifying homes will be the future for this rapidly growing number of seniors. Other factors compounding this evolution of care include our ever-increasing life spans which require longer periods of care and funding. Secondly, over the last three decades, the number of family members, especially daughters, serving as caregivers has shrunk as our society becomes more mobile and career-oriented making a move out of town, state, or country more common. The way we used to care for our elders has changed. Just as nursing homes and personal care homes have provided surrogate care for aging loved ones over the last several decades, the idea of substituting care with home care aides has become more conventional. It helps working daughters (or sons), sandwich generation caregivers, out-of-towners, and spouses to replace or supplement the care they provide.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice states that demographic shift studies translate into some disturbing data. The number of frail older people over 65 is expected to increase from 11 million in 2010 to 18 million in 2030. The percentage of frail older people who are childless is expected to rise from 14 to 18 percent during this period, and the ratio of frail, older people who have only one or two adult children is expected to increase from 38 to 49 percent. Most of these aging boomers will want to remain in their homes, but they may not be able to count on their families for long-term care when it’s needed.

Home Care Can Fill Many Niches

Not only has health care evolved to put a greater emphasis on community-based services, but home care itself is evolving. Traditional housekeeping, cooking, companionship, transportation and assistance with activities like bathing and dressing are generally offered by most non-medical home care providers. However, home care providers such as Messiah Lifeways At Home now offer a unique array of services that buoy one’s ability to live safely and more carefree at home. Some of these newer and less known options include: pet and plant care, non-skilled home maintenance, downsizing services, assistance with home exercise programs, and technology/computer assistance.

Lastly, in a time where the expanding need, along with the absence of consistent familial support, continue to grow, home care staff fill a void and become more than just caregivers for their clients. They become almost like close friends or even family. They’re a large part of why home care is poised to play a key role as the center of health care in our country.


To learn more about Messiah Lifeways At Home go to messiahlifeways.org/AtHome or call 717.790.8209. For information on home care services for the entire state, visit the Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA) home care locator link [click here].

Originally posted November 2013- Revised for November 2015 by: Matthew Gallardo, Messiah Lifeways Coach, BASW, CCP

 

 

Leadership Harrisburg Area Team Brings Recommendations

A talented team from LHA’s 2015 Community Leadership Series visited Messiah Lifeways on Wednesday, April 29 to present their recommendations on Connections, a grassroots effort to help people live strong in the homes they love. Leadership Harrisburg Area is a private, independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in the Capital Region through servant leadership and effective community service. Their mission is to engage, develop, and mobilize a diverse group of skilled leaders to shape our region’s future, strengthen our communities, and enhance the organizations they serve. Each year, as part of their series, they task participants with aiding local non-profits. The team assigned to Connections was asked to deliver recommendations on sustainability and program growth. Several of Connections’ guiding group members and charter members joined in to hear the presentation. Many thanks to LHA for their great work! To learn more about Connections, visit MessiahLifeways.org and choose “Age in Place.”

It’s That Time of Year

The dog days of summer are gone, and it’s nearing that certain time of year again. Sadly, I’m not referring to football season or the beauty of autumn.  Instead I’m referring to Medicare Open Enrollment time. EXCITING! Ok, not so much. But nonetheless, it is a very important time of the year for new enrollees of Medicare along with current beneficiaries that want to make a change to their current coverage.

The Medicare open enrollment period runs from October 15 through December 7, 2013. This is the time when Medicare beneficiaries should review their current plans, compare them to the new plans available for 2014 and make changes as necessary. Information on the 2014 plans should be available by October 1.

Medicare provides health benefits to nearly 50 million seniors and disabled people¹. And that number continues to balloon as nearly 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every single day, thus becoming eligible for Medicare benefits. Due to this surge, Medicare is continually changing and must evolve to prolong its existence. Because of the constant evolution, this wave of consumers quickly discovers or will soon discover navigating Medicare can be confusing, especially as a new beneficiary. Additionally, the complex navigation is not isolated to just the “newbies.” Even as a “seasoned” Medicare beneficiary, you can still face challenges during the annual open enrollment periods. Choosing the right Medicare prescription plan (Part D) or weighing traditional Medicare against Medicare Advantage Plans to fit your budget and need are common quandaries that even tenured beneficiaries face. This labyrinth of terminology, benefits, rules, and the assorted options can be overwhelming. This process of “shopping around” for the right benefits is becoming the new normal.

Knowing that consumers struggle with these issues, this past July, Messiah Lifeways Coaching hosted a workshop entitled “The A, B, C, and Ds of Medicare.” We had a really great turn out and want to continue to offer outreach and education for those who need help with understanding and choosing the Medicare options that are right for them or a loved one. Therefore, Messiah Lifeways will be a host site for a FREE educational presentation entitled Get Your Ducks in a Row” on Monday, September 30 from 10-11 am in Compass Pointe Place at Messiah Village. The program will be presented by APPRISE State Health Insurance Assistance Program. APPRISE counselors will cover topics including the ever befuddling Affordable Care Act, the Marketplace, Medicare Open Enrollment and how APPRISE can help.

Additionally, on Wednesday, November 20 from 10-12 noon, Cumberland County Aging and Community Services and APPRISE will be a hosting a Medicare Annual Enrollment Event once again in Compass Pointe Place. It is geared toward people who are new to Medicare or want to learn more about the Medicare Prescription (Part D) drug benefit and how it works. Enrollees can meet one-on-one with an APPRISE counselor to explore these options by calling 717-240-6110 and scheduling an individual appointment. For a list of additional host sites for enrollment appointments, please click here.

For additional resources on Medicare, check out the links below:

>Medicare.gov

>Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)

>Medicare Tips and Tricks from thirdage.com

>Four Medicare Misconceptions by Kristen Gerencher from the Wall Street Journal- Feb. 11, 2011

¹Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Total Number of Medicare Beneficiaries Statistical Information-2012